Texas Contemporary Art Fair // September 29–October 2

Mindy Solomon is please to present painters Jiha Moon and Jennifer Lefort at the Texas Contemporary Art Fair. Texas Contemporary, Houston’s leading contemporary and modern art fair, brings the country’s best galleries to the area’s discerning collector base. Featuring a range of works and mediums, Texas Contemporary presents what is new in art as well as a focused representation of interests for this unique city.

VIP PREVIEW //
Thursday September 29, 2016 5:30pm to 10:00pm

PUBLIC FAIR HOURS:
Friday, September 30 11:00am to 7:00pm
Saturday, October 1 11:00am to 7:00pm
Sunday, October 2 12:00pm to 6:00pm
>>> TICKETS <<<

Jiha Moon Hers, 2016 Porcelain, underglaze, glaze, Synthetic hair, hand knots, wire, plastic beads 10" x 9" x 5.5"

Jiha Moon
Hers, 2016
Porcelain, underglaze, glaze, Synthetic hair, hand knots, wire, plastic beads
10 x 9 x 5.5 inches

Jiha Moon Peach Mask III, 2016 Ink and Acrylic on Hanji 41" x 39"

Jiha Moon
Peach Mask III, 2016
Ink and Acrylic on Hanji
41 x 39 inches

Jiha Moon Welcome, 2016 Ink and Acrylic on Hanji on Fabric mounted on Panel 16" x 20"

Jiha Moon
Welcome, 2016
Ink and Acrylic on Hanji on Fabric mounted on Panel
16″ x 20″

 

Jennifer Lefort // Traces  2016 60 x 48 inches oil and spray paint on canvas

Jennifer Lefort // Traces
2016
60 x 48 inches
oil and spray paint on canvas

Jennifer Lefort // Where Things Start  2016 72 x 60 inches oil on canvas

Jennifer Lefort // Where Things Start
2016
72 x 60 inches
oil on canvas

// New Works by Elke Sada //

Recently returned from the 3rd Biennial International Ceramics Festival in Sasama, Japan, Elke Sada has new works on view with Mindy Solomon Gallery. In October, she won the prestigious Grassipreis Award from the Carl and Anneliese Goerdeler Foundation in Leipzig, Germany. Please join us in congratulating Elke, and enjoy a few of her new works below!

1_Elke_Panurus biarmicus

Elke Sada // Panurus biarmicus // This work is now part of the collection of Grassimuseum Leipzig

11_Elke_Sada_portrait_1

Elke in residency in Paris // Photo Carole Fékéte

9_Elke_Playground

Playground (detail) // White earthenware, engobes, transparent glossy glaze // 8.7 x 13.4 x 13.8 inches

3_Elke_Salon_Chinoise_II

Salon Chinoise II // White earthenware, engobes, transparent glossy glaze // 7.5 x 10.6 x 11 inches

 

The Daily Wood Featured Event // Sothern, Vidler, Valdes

We are thrilled The Daily Wood chose to feature these exhibitions! Haven’t seen “The Way We See It” or “An Inherent View of the World” yet? Visit us in Little River through December 11th to experience these works up close.

>>> View the full article here. <<<

IMG_0479

Muir Vidler // Debbie Dogbite // 2014 // 20 x 24 inches // c-type print, edition of 6

baby-Boomer_11x17_-pigment-print_-LA2011--$800

Scot Sothern // Baby Boomer // 2011 // 11 x 17 inches // Pigment print

aninherentviewofthewolrd-2015-7x16x16-installtionofcolleteddecoratieobjectsmadeofporcelainbonechinaglassmetalandwod

Juana Valdes // An Inherent View of the World // 2015-ongoing // Collected decorative objects made of porcelain, bone china, glass, and wood documented as still life settings

3 Mindy Solomon Gallery Artists // Trophies & Prey in Santa Fe

Trophies and Prey: A Contemporary Bestiary at Peters Project in Santa Fe, New Mexico features gallery artists John Byrd, Kate MacDowell, and Wookjae Maeng. Their works speak true to the symbolism, metaphor, and eco-activist slant of the exhibition.

Trophies and Prey is on view through October 3.

Read more about the exhibition //

byrd-sheep-web

John Byrd, Untitled (Long Horn), 2013 Porcelain, Mixed Media, 23 × 14 × 10 inches

“To enter Santa Fe’s Peters Projects at the moment is to be transported into a hunting-lodge-cum-bestiary, with a decidedly 21st-century twist. The gallery’s current group show Trophies and Prey: A Contemporary Bestiary, curated by Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio, offers a survey of sculpture focused on animals—and humankind’s fraught relationship with them.” -Artsy

nursemaid1

Kate MacDowell, Nursemaid 1, 2015 Hand-built Porcelain, Glaze, 11 × 8½ × 11 inches

nursemaid2_angle

Kate MacDowell, Nursemaid 2, 2015 Hand-built Porcelain, Glaze, 18 × 13½ × 10 inches

nursemaid3

Kate MacDowell, Nursemaid 3, 2015 Hand-built Porcelain, Glaze, 20 × 8 × 14 inches

“Whether we or our politicians know it or not, Nature is party to all our deals and decisions, and she has more votes, a longer memory, and a sterner sense of justice than we do.” – Wendell Berry

Wookjae Maeng, Adaptation #03-Big Horn Sheep, 2012 Porcelain, Wood, 8 3/8 × 11 5/8 × 18 7/8 inches

Wookjae Maeng, Adaptation #03-Big Horn Sheep, 2012
Porcelain, Wood, 8 3/8 × 11 5/8 × 18 7/8 inches

 Wookjae Maeng, Adaptation #03-Big Horn Sheep, 2012 Porcelain, Wood, 8 3/8 × 11 5/8 × 18 7/8 inches

Wookjae Maeng, Adaptation #03-Big Horn Sheep, 2012, Porcelain, Wood, 8 3/8 × 11 5/8 × 18 7/8 inches

 

Wookjae Maeng // Cover Feature in Pasatiempo, Santa Fe

getimageGallery artists Wookjae MaengKate MacDowell, and John Byrd are featured in “Trophies and Prey,” an exhibition curated by Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio at Peters Projects in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

“In late July, news broke of the death of Cecil the lion, a beloved thirteen-year-old lion killed by American dentist Walter Palmer on a bow-hunting  trip in Zimbabwe. Palmer’s safari—coupled with the controversy surrounding Idaho hunter Sabrina Cor­gatelli’s pictures of her kills from a South African trip, which she triumphantly posted on social media—has sparked widespread outrage, prompting many to question the value of big game and sport hunting. In light of this news, Peters Projects’ Trophies and Prey: A Contemporary Bestiary seems especially timely. Together, the show’s eleven artists—Jeremy Brooks, Undine Brod, John Byrd, Beth Cavener, Michelle Erickson, Alessandro Gallo, Jan Huling, Jeff Irwin, Wookjae Maeng, Kate McDowell, and Adelaide Paul—present an engaging survey of multimedia, animal­ themed artworks rife with suggestion and symbolism.”

Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 12.46.28 PM

“The work of South Korean artist Wookjae Maeng perhaps most clearly adheres to the exhibition’s theme. Made of slick white ceramic, Big Horn Sheep is beautiful and commanding, frozen but ultimately unyielding. Its metallic eyes are narrowed in an icy stare, and its mouth is set in a blatantly disapproving grimace. It’s as dramatic and arresting as an ancient Greek bust—and made with the same painstaking, reverential attention to detail.”  -Pasatiempo

 

 

Sunkoo Yuh // Honored with Groot Award

Mindy Solomon Gallery artist Sunkoo Yuh has been selected as the second-place recipient of the prestigious Virginia A. Groot Foundation Award for the development of ceramic sculpture in 2014.

Sunkoo Yuh // I want to know you better/ WOR // 2011 // 27 x 24 x 17" // Porcelain, Glazed, cone 10

Sunkoo Yuh // I Want to Know you Better // 2011 // 27 x 24 x 17″ // Porcelain, Glazed, Cone 10

The ceramic sculpture of SunKoo Yuh, who was born in South Korea in 1960 and immigrated to the United States in 1988, is composed of tight groupings of various forms including plants, animals, fish, and human figures. While Korean art and Buddhist and Confucian beliefs inform some aspects of his imagery, his work is largely driven by implied narratives that often suggest socio-political critiques. The Rubin Center has exhibited two monumental columns that showcase Yuh’s mastery of the complex narrative and of the ceramic medium. Yuh’s work is included in the collections of the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian in Washington, DC, The Philadelphia Museum of Art and The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, among others.

Crane Rider // 2010 // Porcelain, Glazed, Cone 10 // 34 x 18 x 17 inches

Crane Rider // 2010 // Porcelain, Glazed, Cone 10 // 34 x 18 x 17 inches

SunKoo Yuh is currently Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, Athens.  He received his MFA from Alfred University. He has exhibited widely and has received many awards and honors.  He has also been the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, the Grand Prize at the 2nd World Ceramic Biennale International Competition (Icheon, Korea), and The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize.  His work appears in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, Icheon World Ceramic Center, Korea, Oakland Museum of Art, California, and more.

Read More about the Groot Award //
View more Sunkoo Yuh at Mindy Solomon Gallery //

New Works // David Hicks, Dominique Labauvie, Sungyee Kim

Mindy Solomon Gallery is proud to present exciting new works in June by artists David HicksDominique Labauvie, and Sungyee Kim.

David Hicks // Still Life (Blue Bloom) // 2014 // 23 x 24 x 23 inches // Ceramic and steel

David Hicks // Still Life (Blue Bloom) // 2014 // 23 x 24 x 23 inches // Ceramic and steel

David Hicks states, regarding his work: “Agriculture speaks to me about my own human experience. In the agricultural world there are cycles that that feel like allegorical references to a human struggle, a struggle that starts with fertilization, moves through growth and finally ends in decay…This is the language I speak through and engage in my sculpture, a language of origin, form and beauty.”

View more David Hicks // 


Dominique Labauvie // The City Beat // 2014 // 81 x 60 x 31 inches // Forged steel

Dominique Labauvie // The City Beat // 2014 // 81 x 60 x 31 inches // Forged steel

Dominique Labauvie explains his focus on the line in his sculptures as having a double origin: classical work by Auguste Rodin—particularly the drawings of the Cathedrals of France, and the practice of steel and forge. In his own words, Labauvie describes his art: “A line of steel is for me a line that is built in segments. The segments interpret a handwriting, the movements of the arm and the hand. It is a line that is strengthened through its interruptions, with each interruption creating intervals and moments of silence.”

View more Dominique Labauvie //


Sungyee Kim // Meditation 35 / Memory 2 // 2014 // 30 x 30 inches // Sumi ink and mixed media

Sungyee Kim // Meditation 35 / Memory 2 // 2014 // 30 x 30 inches // Sumi ink and mixed media

In her densely layered paintings, Sungyee Kim incorporates the principles of I Ching with the Taoistic pursuit of becoming one with material as in the Transformation of Things, the Buddhist concept of the whole universe within a single dust particle. The result of these repetitive yet unique gestures of layering and erasing reflects the inherent connectedness of microcosm and macrocosm.

View more Sungyee Kim // 

Wookjae Maeng // Featured on CFile Website for Contemporary Ceramics

Mindy Solomon Gallery artist Wookjae Maeng is prominently featured this week on CFile, globally the number one source for news on contemporary ceramics (an educational program of the CFile Foundation). The article explores Wookjae Maeng’s confrontation of human/animal relationships and the concept of natural beauty as trophy, which Maeng’s nature-conscious art addresses through his iconic porcelain animal busts.

Screen Shot 2014-05-16 at 8.53.13 AM

Wookjae Maeng // Adaptation (Big Horn Sheep) (Detail) // 2012 // 6.75 x 7 x 10 inches

Wookjae Maeng // Adaptation (Big Horn Sheep) (Detail) // 2012 // 6.75 x 7 x 10 inches

Wookjae Maeng // Hiding Deer // 2013 // 9 4/5 x 12 1/5 x 2 2/5 inches // Porcelain and wood

Wookjae Maeng // Hiding Deer // 2013 // 9 4/5 x 12 1/5 x 2 2/5 inches // Porcelain and wood

Wookjae Maeng

Wookjae Maeng

Read the entire CFile article //
More Wookjae Maeng at Mindy Solomon Gallery // 

Mindy Solomon Gallery Presents ‘Southern Fried,’ An Exhibition of Work by Jeremy Chandler, John Byrd, and Jeremiah Jenkins Wynwood Art District, Miami from Thursday, November 21st – December 16th, 2013

Mindy Solomon, premiering her new gallery in the center of the Wynwood Art District this fall, brings over two decades of international art experience as an educator, collector, and gallerist. Ranked in 2013 as one of the top six galleries in Florida by the prestigious Louise Blouin Media Modern Painters magazine, her sophisticated and bold curating style continues in Miami with a group exhibition by contemporary Southern artists Jeremy Chandler, John Byrd, and Jeremiah Jenkins. A collection of photographic and sculptural works appear in an exhibition entitled ‘Southern Fried.’ The Opening Reception will be held Thursday, November 21st, from 6:00-9:00pm. The exhibition will be on view from November 22nd through December 16th.

“You learn to forgive [the South] for its narrow mind and growing pains because it has a huge heart. You forgive the stifling summers because the spring is lush and pastel sprinkled, because winter is merciful and brief, because corn bread and sweet tea and fried chicken are every bit as vital to a Sunday as getting dressed up for church, and because any southerner worth their salt says please and thank you. It’s soft air and summer vines, pinewoods and fat homegrown tomatoes. It’s pulling the fruit right off a peach tree and letting the juice run down your chin. It’s a closeted and profound appreciation for our neighbors in Alabama who bear the brunt of the Bubba jokes. The South gets in your blood and nose and skin bone-deep. I am less a part of the South than it is part of me. It’s a romantic notion, being overcome by geography. But we are all a little starry-eyed down here. We’re Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara and Rosa Parks all at once.” -Amanda Kyle Williams 


‘Southern Fried’ is a multi-faceted term. It implies a style of cooking—crispy, hot, juicy, and full of grease and fat, evoking a sense of sinful unbridled goodness. It also represents a state of malaise and unease; unending heat and stickiness, mosquitos, skewed politics, antiquated behaviors and a lack of interest in anything beyond the next monster truck and tractor pull. How does one who grew up in the northeast learn to love the simple ways of the country such as the joys of fishing off a pier before sunrise? Shorts and flip-flops in the fanciest of restaurants and grouper sandwiches as haute cuisine? In that environment it is easy to judge, but it grows within you—a love of the swamps and mangroves, an appreciation for a sleeping rat snake soaking up the sunlight on a palmetto branch. Spiders the size of your fist ratcheting up bedroom walls, even pesky palmetto bugs outracing your broom on the garage floor, or warm breezes against brilliant sunsets the likes of which you have never seen anywhere else. These are the things that are true. This is the environment where Jeremy Chandler, John Byrd, and Jeremiah Jenkins formed their first sentences and rudimentary scribbles—observed the cultural and emotional demands of their childhoods, and created their own independent artistic dialogues as a reaction response to the land that formed them and gave them their uniquely ‘Southern Fried’ perspective. Gallery Director Mindy Solomon states: “Perhaps their point of view will harken in you the transformation that has happened to me—an appreciation for things charming and honest, and wonderfully imperfect.”
Jeremy Chandler // Boy Swimming Against the Current // 2013 // Available 18 x 24, 30 x 40, 40 x 50 inches // Archival pigment print

Jeremy Chandler // Boy Swimming Against the Current // 2013 // Available 18 x 24, 30 x 40, 40 x 50 inches // Archival pigment print

The artists in this exhibition offer statements about their works, in their own words:

Jeremy Chandler: “Growing up in rural north Florida, I experienced the landscape directly and intimately. The forests and rivers were isolated, malleable spaces where my friends and I expressed our imaginations through physical interactions with the places we explored. In this way, the Southern landscape became something else and these experiences formed vivid, tactile memories, which I often attempt to articulate through my photographs now as an adult artist. My work is informed as much by my cultural identity as a Southerner as well as my curiosity about other people’s relationships with the Southern landscape. Moreover, my work questions traditional notions of masculinity, which are also often expressed through men’s relationships with the forest and with one another within this context. Whether it is through the constructing and photographing of objects, staged narratives or straight photography, the photographs in ‘Southern Fried’ represent a variety of ways of engaging the Floridian landscape as well as my own notions of place.”

John Byrd: “I was raised in the rural mountains of North Carolina, in a family with an old and deep Southern heritage. And while I grew up without want or need, I was aware that we didn’t live up to the cultural aspirations of the antique furniture we’d inherited (markings of a family reduced by the Civil War, the furniture’s fine woodwork stood in distinct contrast to the cheaper and disposable aesthetic of the items it now contained). In my upbringing, I remember defining and cataloging the variable cultural qualities of both of objects and experiences within our lives, especially in comparison to those of my poorer friends and wealthier neighbors.  I generally assess a particular hierarchy of media and cultural qualities that I associate with those aesthetic judgments, and often apply skilled processes to either contradict or reinforce them.  (Ultimately I think I’m drawn to the challenge of taking disparate materials and cultural references, that when submitted to finely crafted and obsessive dedication, can exceed the assumed limits of either its media or class). Important to me is the idea of ‘double coding.’  I want to both honor and critique the components of my Southern cultural experience, whether it be one that seems common or more culturally elite.  I typically use a fairly accessible visually language.  The individual parts of my assemblies are usually recognizable either in form, craft, or cultural context.  Ultimately my work is the continuation of a struggle to reconcile my personal identity.  Partly it feels like reclamation. For example, I wasn’t allowed to hunt as a child.  [In my artwork,] I think I fixated on taxidermy as a souvenir of Southern experience, a merit badge of southern masculinity.  One I didn’t receive in my youth. Part of my visual language is that of autonomous, decorative art objects (figurines, trophies, souvenirs). Within a domestic space, I’m intrigued by the ability of an encapsulated aesthetic to establish, defy, and challenge characteristics of culture and class. ”

Jeremiah Jenkins“My art is about taking objects and making subtle but significant changes to them to alter their meaning.  In our minds things have symbolism.  By mixing up this symbolism I attempt to tell a story, suggest an idea, or ask a question.  My ideas are part spiritual, part anthropological, part philosophical, and part constructive.  I was born in a valley in the Appalachian mountains.  At the time we lived in a different valley, but shortly moved to another valley. I grew up in that final valley. My mom hung old tools and antiques on the wall of our kitchen like a museum. I was fascinated by the stories and meanings of the objects.  This impacted my art process a great deal.   When I was 11, a friend of my mom’s came to our house.  My grandfather showed up and opened the back hatch of his baby blue Plymouth Omni.  He pulled the carpet aside and began to lay out several handguns.  My mother’s friend began test firing them at two large logs stacked on top of each other.  On his last shot with the Glock 9mm the top log fell off.  While the men started talking cash, I ran up to the target.  The last bullet had gone in between the logs and wedged them apart.  The bullet was laying there at the end of a groove carved into the exposed wood grain.  This is what making art is like for me. The moments when things come together by chance, accident, or force to form a new point of orientation, like crossing lines on a map. I now live on a hill in the West.  My world has expanded and I can see beyond the ridges of the valley.  The experiences I was exposed to in my life in the South keep coming up in my art.  Deer and hunting, NASCAR and nature, religion and guns, flea markets, and everything else keep surfacing in my consciousness.  I don’t make art about the South; I only make art as a Southerner.”

John Byrd // Untitled - (N)ever the Worst of Us // 2013 // 66 x 22 x 22 inches // Hand-built porcelain, taxidermy, mixed media

John Byrd // Untitled – (N)ever the Worst of Us // 2013 // 66 x 22 x 22 inches // Hand-built porcelain, taxidermy, mixed media

Mindy Solomon Gallery is located at 172 NW 24th Street in Miami, Florida, open 11:00am-5:00pm Tuesday through Saturday, and by appointment; call 786-953-6917 or email info@mindysolomon.com for information.
Jeremiah Jenkins // Deskset (Run on the Bank) // 2013 // 16 x 10 x 6 inches // Brass, stone, pen, paint, clock

Jeremiah Jenkins // Deskset (Run on the Bank) // 2013 // 16 x 10 x 6 inches // Brass, stone, pen, paint, clock

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
Jeremy Chandler is a photographic artist who oscillates between constructing narrative images and engaging ephemeral communities through prolonged portrait series. His work questions traditional notions of masculinity, which are also often expressed through men’s relationships with the forest and with one another within this context. In addition to being the 2008 Photographer Laureate for the city of Tampa, he has been included in numerous group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and his work is held in public and private collections worldwide. He received his BFA from the University of Florida in Creative Photography and his MFA at the University of South Florida. Chandler is currently an Assistant Professor and Photography Area Coordinator in the Art Department at Southern Connecticut State University.

John Byrd is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Florida. He received his BFA in Ceramics from Louisiana State University and his MFA in Ceramics from the University of Washington in 2000. His work has been shown in galleries and museums throughout the United States and abroad.

Visit John Byrd’s website //

Jeremiah Jenkins was born in Tennessee and now lives and works in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Visit Jeremiah Jenkins’ website //

ABOUT MINDY SOLOMON GALLERY

Mindy Solomon Gallery specializes in contemporary emerging and mid-career artists. Represented works include painting, sculpture, photography, and video in both narrative and non-objective styles. Solomon also exhibits some of the most prestigious contemporary Korean artists on the world market. With an interest in client education, such as a collectors’ tour to South Korea, and regular artists’ talks and VIP events, the gallery and its programs endeavor to showcase a unique and bold view of the international art world. Deeply interested in the intersection of art and design, Ms. Solomon and her team collaborate with designers, advisors, consultants and curators to inform and integrate fine works of art as part of a greater aesthetic.

One of only six galleries in Florida to be included in ‘Top 500 Galleries Worldwide’ in the Louise Blouin Media Modern Painters 2013 Annual Guide, Mindy Solomon Gallery participates in many prestigious art fairs, including the upcoming Art Miami fair during Art Basel’s Art Week in Miami Beach, as well as the Zona Maco Contemporary Art Fair in Mexico City, VOLTA NY, and Shanghai Contemporary.

The mission of the Mindy Solomon Gallery is to present the highest caliber works from emerging and mid-career artists in a broad spectrum of media. With a focus on context and the interconnectedness of material, Mindy Solomon and her staff approach the client/artist relationship with an interest in education and visual empowerment.

Mindy Solomon Gallery Presents ‘Magical Thinking’ // Texas Contemporary Art Fair October 10-13, Booth #807

tx-logo3

Mindy Solomon Gallery returns to the Texas Contemporary Art Fair for the third year, presenting ‘Magical Thinking:’ The Narratives of Marc Burckhardt, Kate MacDowell, Christina West, and Christopher Winter.  The exhibition will be on view October 10-13 at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, booth number 807.

(L) Kate MacDowell // Untitled // 2013 // 9 x 9 x 3.5" // Hand-built porcelain, cone 6 glaze  (R) Marc Burckhardt // Himmelblick // 2010 / 10 x 10" // Acrylic and oil on wood panel

(L) Kate MacDowell // Untitled // 2013 // 9 x 9 x 3.5″ // Hand-built porcelain, cone 6 glaze
(R) Marc Burckhardt // Himmelblick // 2010 / 10 x 10″ // Acrylic and oil on wood panel

Marc Burckhardt lives and works in Austin, in a 1910 farmhouse in the shadow of downtown. Born in Germany and raised in Texas, Burckhardt’s work juxtaposes old world styles and symbols with very current American themes. Through the study and use of old masters’ techniques such as glazing and layering varnishes, he achieves the texture and luminosity that distinguish his paintings. The aged surface denotes importance and gravity which is then juxtaposed with Burckhardt’s often quirky or mischievous subjects. In 2010 Burckhardt was honored to be named the Texas State Artist by the Texas Legislature and the Texas Commission on the Arts. He is a two-time Hunting Art Prize finalist, and has work in the collections of Sony Records, the W Hotel of Austin, Jann Wenner/Rolling Stone NYC, C3 Presents, Ralph Lauren, Patricia Arquette, and the Johnny Cash estate. His paintings have been included in national and international exhibits including Art Basel in Basel, Switzerland and SCOPE, New York.

Kate MacDowell states that the “…romantic ideal of our relationship to the natural world conflicts with the reality of our current impact on the environment.  My pieces are in part responses to environmental threats…and also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones.”  MacDowell hand-sculpts each piece out of porcelain, chosen for its “ghostly qualities,” often building a solid form and then hollowing it. Smaller forms are built petal by petal, branch by branch, and allow the artist (and the viewer) to become immersed in close study of each structure. Porcelain  highlights both the impermanence and fragility of natural forms in a dying ecosystem, while paradoxically being a material that can last for thousands of years, historically associated with high status and value.   The artist “sees each piece as a captured and preserved specimen, a painstaking record of endangered natural forms and a commentary on our own culpability.”

(L) Christina West // Untitled (Standing Female & Seated Male in T-Shirt) // 2012 // 27.5 x 9 x 17" // Painted aqua resin (R) Christopher Winter // Dog Fight // 2012 // 47 x 67" // Acrylic on canvas

(L) Christina West // Untitled (Standing Female & Seated Male in T-Shirt) //
                             2012 // 27.5 x 9 x 17″ // Painted aqua resin
(R) Christopher Winter // Dog Fight // 2012 // 47 x 67″ // Acrylic on canvas

Christina West sculpts realistically rendered human figures that exist at a strange scale and exhibit bold, unnatural colors. The figures are frozen mid-gesture, inviting our gazes and encouraging projection about the nature of their actions.  West lives in Atlanta, Georgia, where she teaches at Georgia State University. She received a BFA from Siena Heights University in 2003, and an MFA from Alfred University in 2006. She has been an artist-in-residence at the Archie Bray Foundation, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and The Clay Studio in Philadelphia. Her work has been supported additiona lly by a grants and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the George Sugarman Foundation, the Mary L. Nohl Artist Fund, and the Southeastern College Art Conference.

Berlin-based artist Christopher Winter‘s singular paintings remind us that, once upon a time, art and magic emerged simultaneously, and indeed were one and the same.  He leads viewers on a “darkly magical mystery tour” with himself, the artist-magician, as ther guide.  Winter exults in the subliminal: “the weightless borderline between innocence and experience, the pastoral and the eldritch, the familiar and the uncanny, the perceiver and the perceived.”  He utilizes the unique aesthetic relationship of painting to American pop art and comics to challenge the audience in every respect. If representational painting seems to have gone largely to its limits, then there is a painter like Winter who challenges this assumption with smart references to art history and an almost brazen naivety in inventing bizarre situations.